Category Archives: Uncategorized

If headstones could talk

A Civil War headstone, though not the one mentioned in the post

A Civil War headstone, though not the one mentioned in the post

I had an interesting experience this past week. The Sunday before last I was in Green-Wood Cemetery enjoying the scenery and taking photos now and again as I do. I took a pic of one Civil War headstone that struck my eye. After I got home I did a little research to find what I could on this individual. Searching one of the genealogy websites I found out he was an accomplished middle-grade officer in the 5th New York. There are many veterans of Duryees Zouaves in Green-Wood. I soon realized he was in someone’s family tree and so I emailed the lady about my pics and the records I found. I would love to share them here, but for privacy and decorum’s sake I will refrain.

Well, before I knew it I got an email back from the woman who told me she had never known her great, great grandfather had been a Civil War veteran. I found that a little odd given the man’s stature, but that’s the way it goes sometimes. I was happy to provide the information.

Now that spring is almost here I am going to get into the cemeteries of New York City in a bigger, more systematic way. The Hayfoot and I have been to a good many here and in DC, but it has always been haphazard. To a degree this was intentional: I go to Green-Wood because it is around the corner and I am trying to unwind on a weekend day. I almost submitted a proposal to the Association of Gravestone Studies conference in Indiana based on the graves of the various Roosevelts buried in the Greater New York and DC areas but decided I was not quite ready. Maybe next year.

Comments Off

Filed under Uncategorized

Unwindings

postcard of Youngstown, Ohio, c. 1910

postcard of Youngstown, Ohio, c. 1910

Last night I finished George Packer’s sobering new book The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America. Packer consciously modeled the book on John Dos Passos’s USA Trilogy. Passos’s Trilogy depicted America as it was between 1910-1930. Packer talks about America between roughly 1970 and today. Trilogy was a series of novels; the stories told in The Unwinding are all too real.

It occurred to me when I read the book that I have never lived in a world where there was no Rust Belt. I found myself wishing my great friend Charles Hirsch were still alive. He was precisely twenty years old than I am and grew up at the tail end of Industrialized America. The loss of our manufacturing job base was something he talked about frequently. Were he still here today we would have talked about Packer’s book and broken it down.

This past November before he died we were planning a trip for this upcoming summer to his native Minnesota, where he was going to take me to some of the old mining towns and places like that. He would have been the perfect guide.

Packer does more than just discuss the collapse of American manufacturing. He tells the story of the deficit, banking crisis, political stalemate, and other ills that have plagued us in recent years. The book works because he puts a human face on the issues. He lets people from all sides tell their stories of success and/or failure in their own words.

I found myself getting older reading the farther I read along. So much of what seems like current events to me–say the energy crisis of the early 1970s–now reads as history. It is terrifying, too, to realize that the wheels aren’t on as tightly as you think they are.

Comments Off

Filed under Uncategorized

Checking in

I am sorry about the lack of posts recently. It may seem I have been slacking but I have actually been actively writing these past few weeks. Today I put the nearly-final touches on the third of three encyclopedia articles. Tomorrow I will give it one last proofread and then send off to the editor.  It’s not something one does forever but I have written a dozen or so encyclopedia articles now and feel I always get something out of the process. I found these ones especially enjoyable and worthwhile to write. All three were related to NPS sites. I knew a fair amount about how national parks and monuments are created but I feel I now have a fresher perspective. Staring at the blank page will do that for you.

I have also been busy putting a proposal together for something about which I will comment if it transpires. Time will tell.

If you are on Facebook and have not “liked” the Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace National Historic Site Facebook I urge you to do so if you have the desire. One of the reasons my posting has been lighter here is because I have been doing some things for the TRB. I have been there almost five months and have been enjoying it a great deal. Roosevelt is great because one can take any aspect of American history and make TR part of the story. He is an interpreter’s dream.

The Theodore Roosevelt Sr. I am writing is underway as well. I am a little concerned about finding enough primary material but I think there is enough. He is a fascinating guy in his own right. His is a story worth telling. I was in Green-Wood this past Sunday roaming around the Roosevelt and other headstones. So many great stories…

Comments Off

Filed under Uncategorized

Sunday morning coffee

The supporting cast of Barney Miller in a 1975 publicity still

The supporting cast of Barney Miller in a 1975 publicity still

Because it has been  a long week we thought we would focus this Sunday morning on some lighter fare, this interview about 1970s television show Barney Miller. I have never understood why this show–which did last eight seasons–is not a greater part of our cultural memory. That it fell between genres–cop show, escapist sit com, socially relevant sit com–is the best I can come up with. One thing I think that hurt BM was being on ABC instead of CBS. The Tiffany Network, with its stable of Norman Lear shows such as All in the Family, Maude, One Day at a Time, and others, would have done a better job generating a following.

I have wanted to watch old episodes but alas BM is not available on either Amazon Prime or Streaming Netflix.

I had never thought about the idea that a show about a police precinct would itself be a statement coming after the social unrest of the 1960s. I know BM is in syndication and still watched by a large number of folks. I imagine though that its audience is primarily aging and watching for its nostalgia factor. It would be great if this show were rediscovered by a younger cohort in that “everything old is new again” vein in which popular culture operates.

Comments Off

Filed under Uncategorized

The Hair Club for Men, circa 1900

I was looking something up in a 1903 copy of Scientific American earlier today when I got distracted by the ads in the back. Here is one that was so irresistible I had to share.

IMG_0381

Comments Off

Filed under Uncategorized

Beecher standing sentinel

The was the John Quincy Adams Ward statue of Henry Ward Beecher as it was late this afternoon. With Super Bowl 48 now in the books we can look forward to pitchers and catchers reporting in a few weeks. Can spring be far behind?

IMG_0311

Comments Off

Filed under Uncategorized

You never know what you’ll find at the library.

I was working at the public library today. One of the books I was using was an old tome published just after the Civil War. When I opened it, out fell this call slip from someone who had requested the book in December 1961.

IMG_0307

Comments Off

Filed under Uncategorized

DC doings

The entranceway of Alice Roosevelt Longworth's Dupont Circle house

The entranceway of Alice Roosevelt Longworth’s Dupont Circle house

I am sorry for the lack of posts this week, but I have been busy. I am in Washington doing research at the Library of Congress for my Joseph Hawley book. The Hayfoot and I have also been hitting some Theodore Roosevelt-related sites. They have not been posted yet, but I am writing a series of posts for the Roosevelt Birthplace Facebook page about various Roosevelt-in-Washington places. Look for those later this week on the TRB Facebook page.

We intentionally chose three in the Dupont Circle area to make it easier logistically. When we visited Alice Roosevelt Longworth’s house (2009 Massachusetts Avenue, NW), a dour lady from the Washington Legal Foundation, the site’s current occupant, told us it is not a public space and shut the door in our faces. Oh well. We had a good laugh about it.

My table at the Library of Congress

My table at the Library of Congress

The book is very much in the nascent stages but it is finally starting to gel. Looking at reels and reels of microfilm is exhausting but the hardest part was realizing the scope and tome of the book. I had that epiphany the other night and when I did the load got a lot lighter. I guess the whole thing from start to finish will be a process with forward and backward steps. It is amazing what can happen when you just start.

Working on this book project and writing content for the TRB website, along with my volunteering duties at the site, are going to be my intellectual pursuits for 2014. Despite a few crises of confidence it has been so far so good.

Comments Off

Filed under Joseph Roswell Hawley, Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace (NPS), Uncategorized, Washington, D.C.

Greetings from the Frozen Apple

p.phpI got back from Florida late last night, about seven hours overdue. All told, I was one of the lucky ones. Yesterday I dealt with the avalanche of snow; today I am dealing with the avalanche of emails found in my in-box. One thing that caught my eye was this piece from the Washington Post about the new Senior Historian at the National Portrait Gallery, David Ward. The NPG is one our country’s great treasures. I love the part at the beginning where he talks about Theodore Roosevelt and the 1913 Armory Show. Roosevelt the Connoisseur is something I wrote about in late November. It is a prominent theme in my Interp at the Birthplace. When I am in Washington later this month I am going to see if they indeed changed the signage next to the sketch of the Colonel.

I am looking forward to getting back into the swing of things.

(image by Charles Dana Gibson/NPG)

Comments Off

Filed under Uncategorized

Merry Christmas

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized